Print This Page (simplified layout)

Religious Studies

The earth-centred universe in a 16th-century engraving by Jost Amman.

The earth-centred universe in a 16th-century engraving by Jost Amman.

The Museum’s collection provides a fascinating context through which to explore the relationship between science and religion from the 16th-century debate over Copernicus’ new heliocentric model of the solar system and Galileo’s conflict with the Church of Rome, to controversies surrounding 18th-century Newtonianism and debates over natural theology. The Museum also has a fine collection of early Islamic instruments used for religious as well as scientific purposes including astrolabes and qibla indicators, and an extensive collection of objects relating to astronomy and time-keeping.

Taught sessions for secondary and post-16 are normally available on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Sessions vary in length between 1-2 hours and normally accommodate between 20-30 students depending on the session.

For more information about facilities and arrangments for visits, please see http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/education/visit/.

For enquiries and bookings, please email: secondary+post16@mhs.ox.ac.uk