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Religious Studies

The earth-centred universe in a 16th-century engraving by Jost Amman.

The earth-centred universe in a 16th-century engraving by Jost Amman.

The Museum’s collection provides a fascinating context through which to explore the relationship between science and religion from the 16th-century debate over Copernicus’ new heliocentric model of the solar system and Galileo’s conflict with the Church of Rome, to controversies surrounding 18th-century Newtonianism and debates over natural theology. The Museum also has a fine collection of early Islamic instruments used for religious as well as scientific purposes such as astrolabes and qibla indicators, and an extensive collection of objects relating to astronomy and time-keeping.

Secondary programme leaflet [pdf]

Secondary and post-16 sessions are:

  • usually available on Wednesdays, Thursdays or Fridays
  • between 1- 2 hours with flexible start times
  • adaptable to suit individual needs
  • mostly accommodate between 20-30 students

Please contact the education officer if you would like more information about an existing session or to discuss a proposal for a bespoke session. You may wish look at sessions listed under Science or History to see what might be adapted which include a session on Science and Islam.

You may wish to consider a combined visit to the Oxford University Museum of Natural History or the Ashmolean Museum.